When you have a person/people in your life that you’ve decided to:

A. Cut ties with…

B. Establish clear boundaries with so you don’t have to cut ties (yet)…

Then, only you know (albeit some members of your support system) how hard you’ve had to work to get yourself to that point. …


As a child, I had an average amount of friends. I either had a best friend, a group of close neighborhood friends, or friends from my youth group. None of my friends were really friends with one another, though, and by the time I got to high school, I was kind of a floater (I still am).

For the most part, people in school seemed to like me. They’d want to sit next to me in class or in the lunchroom, and we met up at school functions. They’d laugh at my jokes and spend time with me the hallways…


My husband and I have been living abroad for nearly seven years, leaving for the expat life shortly after we graduated (and met) from college in 2013. We have lived in South Korea and Mexico, having worked as English teachers, classroom teachers, and more recently, full-time freelancers for the last three years.

Though we could have easily lived this life forever (at least I could have, anyway), we started to want different things. We missed our friends and families, and some of the conveniences and familiarity of living in our “home” country. Of course, the notion of “home” was always…


I am so blessed to have so many amazing friends in my life, who have worked hard to stay in touch with me despite the fact I’ve been living out of the country for seven years.

All of my friends have great qualities and beautiful things about them that I admire, and I would never for a minute compare any of them.

But, one of my best friends has earned the term “mom” friend (though, I recently told her during my speech at her wedding that she’s actually the “sister I never had”). …


When I was a kid, I remember my teacher reading us the book “BOY” by Roald Dahl. Out of all the amazing stories this author has brought to myself and other readers over the years, there was one thing that stuck out to me from the very first chapter of “BOY”.

“When my father was fourteen, which is still more than one hundred years ago, he was up on the roof of the family house replacing some loose tiles when he slipped and fell. He broke his left arm below the elbow. Somebody ran to fetch the doctor, and half…


When I was a young child and was out in public with my grandmother and had to use the bathroom, she’d grab me by the wrist, drag me into the restroom and spend a good five-minutes layering the toilet seat with toilet paper, all while I crossed my legs holding in my pee, protesting and begging her to hurry up.

When all was covered and not a single inch of porcelain was showing, she’d pick me up and plop me down on my butt, lecturing me about how dirty toilet seats are. …


A part of our collective Jewish identity or are we disregarding survivors?

My whole life, a defining part of my Jewish education experience had been the Holocaust — the Shoah. From as early as I can remember, we read books in Hebrew school (and in public school), from the Diary of Anne Frank to Number the Stars. We learned about the plight of the Jewish people, and we said prayers to honor those who had passed in this horrific event in history. We listened to survivors speak about their experiences and how important it is to continue to “Remember the Holocaust.” …


Last night, I spoke with a friend about how we are both handling our individual self-isolation situations. We talked about the mood swings, the emotional toll, the wanting to do everything and nothing, and the doing nothing.

You see, right now, there are SO many options available to pass the time. And, that’s great.

You can do a virtual museum tour. You can do a free online yoga class. You can take a course or learn a language. You can write more stories about COVID-19 on Medium. You can start that YouTube channel or business you always wanted, because the…


As I write this from self-isolation in Bangkok, learning that the State Department is urging Americans to come back home IMMEDIATELY, I am struggling with what to do. Yes, my husband and I are U.S. citizens, but it is not our home. We have not lived there in seven years.

In fact, we don’t live anywhere. Before coming on this “trip”, we were living in Mexico for three years, where we are residents. In January, we moved our belongings back to my parents’ house (including our dog), and set off on a indefinite journey until we were ready to return…


Trigger Warning: Suicide, anxiety, depression.

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This week, yet another K-Pop artist — Goo Hara — has taken her life just a few months after another K-Pop artist — Sulli — took hers. Sadly, these are not the only Korean idols in the spotlight that have committed suicide, and if things keep going in this direction, then they may not be the last.

Many of us have heard about the extreme pressures that these stars are under throughout the duration of their restrictive contracts. While I am not a big follower of K-Pop and I understand…

Hana_LaRock

I have a lot to say - that my editors may not necessarily approve of. So, I’m coming here to write about what I feel needs to be told and heard.

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